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Female botanists emerge

10 April 2017

Kim McKay AO, Director & CEO of the Australian Museum, for Transformations: Art of the Scott Sisters

Sisters Helena and Harriet Scott collected, studied and drew the butterflies and botany of New South Wales in precise detail. Unrecognised at the time because they were female, this multi-media exhibition at the Australian Museum brings the Scott Sisters’ and their work to life, affording them the recognition they so deserve.

Scott Sisters

Tailed Emperor by Helena Scott Photographer:  © Australian Museum

Place: Australian Museum - Level 1, 1 William St, Sydney

Event Type: Everyday event

Date: to 25 June 2017

Time: 09.30 AM to 05.00 PM

Admission: Free after admission

Kim Mckay

As Director and CEO of the Australian Museum (AM), Kim McKay (above) is responsible for strategic planning and management of the nation’s first museum, including a collection of over 18 million natural science and cultural objects.

Since being appointed to the Director’s role in April 2014 (the first woman to hold the role in the AM’s 190 year history), Kim has initiated an impressive transformation program. This includes enshrining free general admission for children into government policy, constructing a new award-winning entrance pavilion, Crystal Hall; creating new galleries and programs, including establishing the Australian Museum Centre for Citizen Science (part of the Australian Museum Research Institute, AMRI); and undertaking a comprehensive and strategic re-branding campaign. She previously served for two years as a Trustee of the AM.

Kim is a strong supporter of women in leadership. She actively promotes women within the Australian Museum, including in her executive leadership team and across the Museums sector where she has championed a nation-wide mentoring program. She is on the advisory board of the One Million Women organisation and, in 2011, was named in the Australian Financial Review’s 100 Women of Influence list, and was included in the book 'The Power of 100...One Hundred Women who have Shaped Australia. 

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