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Ruby, pieces to amuse and educate

08 November 2013

Luxury logo fatigue

According to the international market research company Euromonitor, in a report by the Business of Fashion, “despite continued macroeconomic uncertainty and sluggish profit reports from major luxury brands, [there’s reason to] remain optimistic about the industry’s growth prospects. Buoyed by a burgeoning middle class in emerging markets across Latin America, Asia Pacific and Africa, in 2013, luxury goods sales will exceed $318 billion worldwide, representing a year-on-year real value gain of 3 per cent (compared to a year-on-year real value gain of over 4 per cent last year)... Spending is projected to increase by more than 35 per cent over the next five years.”

Luxury goods sales will exceed $318 billion worldwide...

And yet, in March 2013, Business of Fashion’s luxury logo fatigue piece reported that we may be reaching a tipping point when it comes to luxury branding, and that we will see the heavily monogrammed and branded luxury brand trend of the recent past diminish.

At Ruby we’re betting on the rise of the one-off, the individual, the handcrafted, the hyper-local and the more subtly branded item, as the customers in these emerging markets become increasingly sophisticated.

For all you ‘guys’ out there with a fantastic well-crafted product ready to market it’s only a matter of time before those customers will become hip to the handmade. If you have a business then now’s the time to ensure you have a strong online presence and a social networking marketing campaign in action - or ready to swing into action. Being prepared could mean the difference between doing well and doing superbly well. (The Westpac Ready For Business website, is specifically designed to help small businesses, particularly during the start-up phase. Meanwhile, Ruby is there to connect, share insights and ideas and meet other like-minded women… )

Public resignation

In 2007 in the US, YouTuber Jo Low uploaded a video titled “My Manager Quits.” It began a spate and now a craze of what’s termed “public resignation” events. The term refers to “the act of quitting your job in front of an audience in real life or on the Internet, usually manifested in the form of an open letter or video recording of a speech” and often, it seems when we looked, accompanied by dance and song. Whether it counts as a formal resignation, we don’t know?

A more recent offshoot of the resignation event is the looking for a flatmate event. Take this example below, a young woman in San Francisco created this poster (below) to find herself a “roomie”, which she loaded to the online classifieds site Craigslist.

flatmate ads

Modern opera

anna nicole

Anna Nicole Smith (above right, Celebrity Photos Pictures Images), born Vickie Lynn Hogan in Texas, became, in her 40 years on this planet, perfect fodder for gossip mags and women’s rag mags. The onetime lap dancer, who became a Playboy Playmate of the Year in 1993 and eventually went on to model for Guess, was probably best known for her breast enlargement and her second marriage to the oil billionaire J. Howard Marshall II (pictured here with Anna Nicole in ‘happier times’). Old enough to be her ‘grandfather’ - he was 89 to her 27 - the ensuing battle over a share to the fortune when Marshall died after just a year of wedded bliss placed Anna Nicole and her lawyer Howard K. Stern firmly in the media’s sights – a lot. Now, Anna’s life and death are the subject of an opera, “Anna Nicole”, by Mark-Anthony Turnage. The whole ‘tragic’ sordid tale has already played in the UK and the US and, despite what you might think about the subject matter, has garnered some remarkably good reviews. If it were to come here, who would play the lead? Cracking the role and injecting it with the right amount of tragedy (and not pity) could be a career changer.

Food fads

On ‘wikiHow to do anything’, there is a 10 step guide to using a knife and fork properly. This is picture 9 of 10, and we just have to ask: who would place their knife and fork in this way to signify they were finished eating?

fork knife

Finger, Fork & Knife

Food blogger, stylist and photographer, local Melbourne girl Kate Olsson certainly knows how to use a knife and fork to her best advantage. Kate began her successful blog Finger, Fork & Knife in 2011 and has worked as a freelance food writer for a number of local Melbourne publications since. She also works for the event company Bright Young Things creating culinary events and produces food stories for various publications. She is about to launch an online food website (heytucker.com), aimed at 18-35 year olds to inspire them to get into the kitchen and release their inner master chef. Below is one of her summer favourites from Finger, Fork & Knife Cucumber, mint and lemon frozen yoghurt sandwiches

cucumber yoghurt sandwich

Tired of hashtags?

Justin Timberlake and Jimmy Fallon are. See them parody the use of hashtags in everyday conversation. What more can we say: http://www.news.com.au/technology/techknow/jimmy-fallon-and-justin-timberlake8217s-8220hashtag8221-video-is-hilarious/story-fnda1lbo-1226728349705

It’s a thought…

Joseph B. Lassiter explains in a recent Harvard Business School article why he believes that nuclear power and shale gas are on the right side of the fight against climate change, and why markets have a better shot at winning the fight than governments do. 

“Most of the time, wealthy people figure out a way to do OK, and it's the poor people who get hammered," says Lassiter. "In my mind, there are some ethics there that each one of us needs to worry about, and today we are each making a de facto decision through our collective inaction. But even the wealthy need to do some soul-searching. If the upper extremes of potential climate changes materialize, I…no, we don't know what will happen. There is a material risk that we will all go into a world where no one knows the consequences to our food supply, our cities, or our society. With every pound of CO2 emitted, we pass a piece of that incalculable risk on to our children each and every day.” 

With every pound of CO2 emitted, we pass a piece of that incalculable risk on to our children each and every day.

The case for combatting climate change with nuclear power and Fracking

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