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Dealing with labor and employment laws relating to social networking

09 March 2017


Organizations that deal with labor and employment laws relating to social networking are caught in a “damned if you do, damned if you don’t” bind. As many laws as one can imagine are applicable. Think of any of these: 
o The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA)
o The Federal Trade Commission
o The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act
o The National Labor Relations Act
o The Health Insurance and Portability Act.
The provisions of any of these laws can be used to deal with labor and employment laws relating to social networking. And add state security requirements, and many other laws to these, and the bevy of laws to deal with labor and employment laws relating to social networking is well rounded. 
Employees are caught in a classic quandary
Yet, there is considerable confusion about what to allow employees to do and what not do when it comes to labor and employment laws relating to social networking laws. Life is difficult for the employer, to put it mildly. Disciplining employees for their comments can open a Pandora’s Box; not doing so does the same.
The focus for dealing with labor and employment laws relating to social networking has now shifted to the courts of late, as they have begun handing judgments in this area. We have been seeing many cases lately, whose decisions have pertained to the social media. These judgments have been specific to the various industries that deal with labor and employment laws relating to social networking.
An understanding of how to deal with these laws and legal issues
How do all these decisions affect organizations that have to deal with labor and employment laws relating to social networking? How does one make sense of these legal issues, and how do these judgments need to be implemented? 
How do organizations that need to deal with labor and employment laws relating to social networking take decisions relating to social networking use by their employees in the light of these judgments?
These will form the basis of a learning session that is being organized by TrainHR, a highly popular provider of professional trainings for the areas of human resources. Susan Desmond Fahey, a Principal in the New Orleans, Louisiana, office of Jackson Lewis P.C., will be the speaker at this webinar. Please log on to http://www.trainhr.com/control/w_product/~product_id=701578?rubyconnection.com   to register for this webinar.
Human Resource Professionals, Business Owners, Risk Managers and those responsible for compliance with Sarbanes Oxley can gain complete and proper understanding of how labor and employment laws relating to social networking apply to their organization, their impact, and all other related aspects of this subject.
This webinar has been approved for 1.5 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR, PHR, PHRca, SPHR, GPHR, PHRi and SPHRi recertification through HR Certification Institute (HRCI).
A clear understanding of dealing with labor and employment laws relating to social networking
Susan will show what policies and actions an organization that comes under labor and employment laws relating to social networking needs to take in order to be in compliance with the laws. She will cover the following areas at this highly interesting and educative session:
o Identification of social media
o Why social networking has become the human resource professional's latest friend.
o Why social networking has become the human resource professional's latest enemy.
o The National Labor Relations Board's position on disciplining employees for statement made on social networking sites
o The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority's position on social networking
o The Federal Trade Commission's guidelines regarding businesses using social media for endorsement purposes
o What GINA says about social networking and obtaining employees' genetic information
o When employee statements can violate HIPAA
o When can a human resource professional use information on social networking sites in conducting background checks
o What policies you should consider to protect your company from inappropriate comments on social networking sites
o How to protect your company's reputation from the disgruntled ex-employee who takes to social networking sites for revenge.

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